Monday, 8 February 2016

Just Short of the Marc

If you've watched any reality TV-style cookery programmes over the last few years then you'll recognise Marcus Wareing as the steely character who's caused many a novice chef to tremble in their aprons. And a few of the more established ones too. Happily, since taking over the mantle of judge in MasterChef: Professionals from Michel Roux Jr., Wareing seems to have mellowed somewhat. As we made our way to his eponymous restaurant located in the Berkeley Hotel, we were excited to see what it had in store.

Being a Saturday night, the a la carte option wasn't available so it was 8 course taster menu or bust (though there was a vegetarian variant too). This taster menu did offer a choice of lamb or duck for the main however. After making our choice (both duck) and enjoying our amuse bouches of puffed potato balls, goats cheese and a prawn cracker, we were brought our bread and first set of cutlery before being asked to choose our wine for the evening. This was a little odd though hardly earth-shattering, and indeed our freshly-selected bottle was served up midway through the first course proper.

I can't fault any of the food, or the service, or indeed anything to do with the evening; yet I was left slightly and strangely unfulfilled. Each of the courses was cooked perfectly and all were delicious, and there were a number of real highlights: the quail breast served with pigeon tartare and blood orange was wonderful. The crossover dish of Nottinghamshire (yay!) Colston Bassett Stilton with candied walnuts packed a real punch and the gooey sauce which seated the second dessert was a joy. But these were highlights of an evening - not a lifetime. That's the best way I can put it. I'll be talking and thinking about certain dishes from other meals for years to come, and I just don't think I'll be doing that with any of the courses we were served at Marcus.

Quail, pigeon and blood orange

As an example of a high-quality classical restaurant Marcus ticks all the boxes; but if you're looking for something a bit more contemporary, challenging or innovative then you might be better served looking elsewhere. This isn't a criticism in any way and, of course, food is a very subjective thing, but it was Storm Imogen that nearly blew us away on the evening, rather than anything we'd eaten.